Close Menu

Jamaican Creole

The Language Conundrum for Adolescent Jamaican Boys Living in Inner-city Communities

$10.00
SKU: jedic-19-2-1

One of the defining markers of Jamaican students’ academic success (for teachers and students) is their ability to speak Standard Jamaican English (SJE) fluently. However, SJE fluency is challenging for many majority-speaking Jamaican Creole (JC) boys who experience language conflicts within their social and educational contexts.

List price: Free
Price: $10.00

The Treatment of Jamaican Creole by Curriculum Writers and Selected Teachers of English

Free
SKU: JEDIC-8-12-8

This research investigated curriculum provisions made for the treatment of Jamaican Creole (JC) throughout the education system in Jamaica and the views and practices of teachers involved in the delivery of Language Arts throughout that system; providing insights of the research gained through classroom observation with regard to the efficacy of teachers' practices in relation to these provisions; and highlighting the significance of the insights gained for language education planners in Jamaica, the wider Caribbean and the territories outside of the Caribbean, which share similar language

List price: Free
Price: Free

The Writing Performance in English of African Heritage Students in Two Urban Environments: Birmingham, England and Kingston, Jamaica

Free
SKU: JEDIC-10-1-2

This paper provides a comparative analysis of the writing performance in English of African heritage students in Birmingham, England and Kingston, Jamaica. The study explores the effects of language use on the written production of English among African heritage students in two geographical locations, Birmingham, England and Kingston, Jamaica. Particular attention is drawn to the effects of Jamaican Creole usage in Jamaica and Creole/ Black British Talk in England, on the achievement levels of African heritage students.

List price: Free
Price: Free

Arts-Based Inquiry in Educational Research: Making the Familiar Strange to See Differently

Free
SKU: JEDIC-11-1-12

In this article curriculum provisions made for the treatment of Jamaican Creole (Mother Tongue) throughout the education system in Jamaica and the views and practices of teachers involved in the delivery of Language Arts throughout that system are investigated.

List price: Free
Price: Free

The Writing Performance in English of African Heritage Students in Two Urban Environments: Birmingham, England and Kingston, Jamaica

$10.00
SKU: JEDIC-15-1-1

This paper provides a comparative analysis of the writing performance in English of African heritage students in Birmingham, England and Kingston, Jamaica. The study explores the effects of language use on the written production of English among African heritage students in two geographical locations, Birmingham, England and Kingston, Jamaica. Particular attention is drawn to the effects of Jamaican Creole usage in Jamaica and Creole/Black British Talk in England, on the achievement levels of African heritage students.

List price: Free
Price: $10.00

Systematicity in the Acquisition of Determination by Three-year-old Jamaican Children

$10.00
SKU: CJE 38-2-2

This paper presents aspects of the acquisition of the determiner systems of Jamaican Creole (JC) and Jamaican English (JE) used by Jamaican children from Creole-speaking communities in their first year of basic school. It shows that mixing within the Determiner Phrase of the native language—JC, with the second language—JE, is highly systematic, and suggests ways in which the language and literacy teacher may capitalize on this.

List price: Free
Price: $10.00

Language Teacher or Service Representatives?

$10.00
SKU: CJE 38-2-1

Jamaican Creole (JC) and Standard Jamaican English (SJE) are the two dominant languages in Jamaica but they do not function equally in certain contexts. In public formal domains, the use of JC is limited since most information from the state is disseminated to the public in English. When JC is used in such contexts traditionally reserved for English, linguistic gatekeepers such as teachers and service representatives (SRs), use corrective gate-keeping practices to repair the speech of their interlocutors.

List price: Free
Price: $10.00

Code-switching in Jamaica Creole: Some Educational Implications

Free
SKU: cje-5-1-2-2

The importance to educational practice of linguistic research in the Caribbean has never been underplayed. Although linguistic descriptions have a validity all their own, it is in their application to educational practice that they can best serve our societies.

List price: Free
Price: Free
Subscribe to RSS - Jamaican Creole
Top of Page