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How do they teach? The Jamaican Immigrant Teacher Pedagogy

$10.00
SKU: CJE-41-2

Teacher migration from other countries to the United States has increased over the years. Jamaican teachers have been a part of the migrant teaching force for decades. In this paper, we describe the pedagogy of four first-year migrant Jamaican teachers to a rural school in the southeastern United States. Through qualitative research involving interviews and observations, the authors document dominant themes that emerged concerning these teachers’ practices and their reasons for engaging in these practices.

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Price: $10.00

INTERVIEW: The Change from Within Programme – Creating a Culture of Peace in Schools through Social Affirmation

$10.00
SKU: CJE-41-2

In Earl Lovelace’s celebrated novel, “The Dragon Can’t Dance”, the issue of male violence is explored. The novel reveals how a society’s failure to acknowledge others, to exclude some – in this case the disadvantaged folk (the working class), can lead to their feeling invisible and insignificant. As a result, the human need to be recognized and to be seen can drive the excluded to acts of violence as they assert their right to visibility. More recently, Fatima Bhutto’s best seller, “The Runaways”, explores a similar situation.

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Price: $10.00

Education in Martinique: The Price of Cultural Confusion

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SKU: JEDIC-0201

This article is concerned with the viability of current educational provision in the overseas French departement of Martinique. It contains a critical examination of the French educational system and its implementation overseas. It seeks to illuminate in this context the relationship between educational provision, culturally meaningful learning, and socio-economic participation. 

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The Reluctant Tourist: Reflections on Cultural Colonialism (In Reverse?)

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SKU: CJE-005

The Western tourist in the Caribbean is unavoidably in a position of in-authenticity and naïve but guilty spectatorship—always already on the outside; always ready with a camera—to take /capture/shoot static moments of picturesque in-significance. “Here’s one of me in front of the hotel…on the beach…outside the Independence Monument…” The relation of the ‘tourist’ to the place visited is by its very nature one of impermanence, of temporary, fleeting and superficial pleasure—of escape from the ‘real world’.

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Thoughts on Language, Literacy, and Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy in Jamaican and US Contexts

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SKU: JEDIC 13-1-2

In this article I offer thoughts on my recent conceptualization of culturally sustaining pedagogy (CSP) (Paris, 2012a), building from empirical work with youth of colour in US contexts, and consider what this conceptualization might mean for Jamaica and other countries where Creole Englishes are widely spoken as the lingua franca. Beginning with my own learning about Jamaican Creole and language variation as a child visiting my father’s native Jamaica, I move to sharing some of my research findings from studies of African American Language among youth in California.

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