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Hyacinth Evans

Keynote Address: The Origins of Qualitative Inquiry in the Caribbean

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SKU: JEDIC-11-1-5

The purpose of this article is to describe the origins of qualitative inquiry, research and writing in the Caribbean. The period under review goes back more than 200 years. The paper begins with a discussion of the criteria for determining what counts as qualitative research, the conditions under which research was conducted and made public in the 19th century, and the differences in standards between then and now. It will then briefly describe the categories of work that meet most or all of these criteria for qualitative research.

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Making the Transition from College to Classroom What Knowledge Do Teachers Use and Why?

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SKU: cje-19-1

School personnel often lament the quality of newly trained teachers who, they say, are unable to manage and control classes, and who seem unable to carry out effectively the routines of teaching. Teacher educators decry the rapidity with which the new graduate ceases to attend to important principles and concepts learned in college. Researchers have often referred to the gap between theory (what is taught in college) and practice (what occurs in the classroom).

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The Construction of Gender and Achievement in Secondary Schools in Jamaica

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SKU: cje-21-1-2

In recent years, the differences in academic achievement between boys and girls in many Caribbean countries have been much debated. References have been made to the number of boys and girls who are awarded Common Entrance Examination (CEE) places for entry to secondary schools, the proportion of boys as compared to girls who obtain level 1 or 2 in the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) examination, and the number of men and women enrolled at the University of the West Indies and other tertiary-level institutions.

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Streaming and its Effects on Boys and Girls in Secondary Schools in Jamaica

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SKU: JEDIC-0301

The paper reports results of research on the effects of streaming on boys and girls in secondary schools in Jamaica. The study found that girls were more represented in high stream classes, while boys were more represented in low stream classes. Streaming affected academic achievement, students' experiences of school practices such as being beaten or insulted, and students' sense of alienation from school. There were gender differences in all responses, with low stream boys most likely to do poorly academically and to experience negative school practices.

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