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Vol 62, Issue 5: Personality Disorders - June (2013)

Editorial

Original Articles

  • FW Hickling, G Walcott
    The literature outlining the development and classification of personality disorder is reviewed in order to examine the history of this condition in the context of contemporary post-colonial Jamaican society.
  • FW Hickling, J Martin, G Walcott, V Paisley, N Hutchinson, T Clarke, EN Barton
    The creation and validation of the 38-question Jamaica Personality Disorder Inventory (JPDI) screening questionnaire for the diagnosis of personality disorder piloted on patients from psychiatric and medical wards at the University Hospital of the West Indies is described.
  • FW Hickling, W Walcott, V Paisley
    The distribution and clinically significant patterns of the phenomenology of a naturalistic case-controlled private practice displayed symptoms of a ‘clinical triad’ of power management, dependency and psychosexual issues. This phenomenological approach has been called Shakatani - from the Swahili words shaka (problem) and tani (power), and is suggested to be an Axis I replacement for the four-cluster Axis II classification of the DSM-IV personality disorder.
  • G Walcott, FW Hickling
    The correlates of the phenomenology of conflict, power and authority management in the Jamaican population of 1506 adult individuals were sampled from 2150 households using the 12 questions of the Jamaica Personality Disorder Inventory (JPDI). Nearly one third of the sample population studied reported problems with conflict, abnormal power and authority management, impulse control and serious aggressive and transgressive behaviour.
  • G Walcott, FW Hickling
    The correlates of the phenomenology of dependency in the Jamaican population using the 17 questions of the Jamaica Personality Disorder Inventory (JPDI) are reported. One-quarter of the sample population studied reported problems with physiological and psychological dependency behaviour suggesting that they are still locked in a struggle for psychological independence.
  • G Walcott, FW Hickling
    The correlates of psychosexual phenomenology in the Jamaican population using the seven questions of the Jamaica Personality Disorder Inventory (JPDI) are presented. More than one-fifth of the sample reported some degree of heterosexual and homosexual dysfunction. Significant levels of multiple sexual partnerships and feelings of infidelity in a swathe of Jamaican people reveal underlying psychosexual anxiety and guilt, poor impulse control and difficulties with partner intimacy.
  • S Longman-Mills, K Carpenter
    This article investigated the correlation between interpersonal competence and sex risk behaviours among 500 adolescents from nine randomly selected secondary institutions in Kingston and St Andrew, Jamaica. Results indicate that adolescents with high interpersonal skills are less likely to participate in risky sexual behaviours.
  • I Govia, V Paisley
    This article problematizes the discussion of personality and personalitydisorder, considering how these phenomena are defined, and may manifest in contexts that are underrepresented in extant scholarship on personality and personality disorder. After providing a brief critical review of key findings and debates in the scholarship on normal personality, we discuss the need for combined emic-etic approaches to normal and non-normal personality in underrepresented and understudied contexts, and offer suggestions for programmes of research committed to these tasks.
  • FW Hickling
    One hundred patients seen in the author’s private practice from 1974–2010 with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) diagnosis of personality disorder were treated with psychohistoriographic brief psychotherapy (PBP). Patients with personality disorders showed clinical improvement one year after being treated with PBP.
  • D Jackson Williams
    Jamaican attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help were compared with other samples that utilized the same measure of attitudes. Although Jamaicans seem to hold negative opinions about mental illness, helpseeking attitudes were comparable and in some cases, more favourable.
  • FW Hickling, G Walcott
    A demographic questionnaire and the Jamaica Personality Disorder Inventory (JPDI) were administered to a representative population sample consisting of 1506 Jamaicans, ages 18–64 years. Two-fifths of the population scored above the scale’s cut-point indicating a diagnosis of personality disorder with the level of severity ranging from mild to severe. This suggests a high risk of behavioural dysfunction in the Jamaican population, with significant implications in light of the country’s high rate of crime and violence.
  • FW Hickling, HA Robertson-Hickling
    A two-year trawl of contemporary Jamaican news media articles linking the medical diagnosis of personality disorder to published public scholarship articles on the epidemiology of that condition was conducted. Results suggest that public scholarship reports of this condition prompted a popular media response which in turn generated a health promotion outcome linking contemporary social events to the contemporary medical search on personality disorder.
  • FW Hickling, G Walcott
    Examination and analysis of primary data from the psychosocial case study interviews of 36 convicted murderers from the Jamaican Government Barnett Commission of Enquiry in 1976 using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition-text revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria revealed antisocial personality disorder in two-thirds of the convicted murderers and suggest that antisocial personality disorder represents an aetiological precursor of homicidal violence and is a major public health problem in onntemporary Jamaica.
  • G Walcott, J Martin, FW Hickling
    The prevalence of personality disorder assessed by the Jamaica Personality Disorder Inventory (JPDI) and the consultant Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition-text revision (DSM IV-TR) instruments in Jamaica is comparable to the prevalence rate of studies in other countries in a similar population.
  • J Martin, G Walcott, T Clarke, EN Barton, FW Hickling
    The prevalence of personality disorder assessed by the Jamaica Personality Disorder Inventory (JPDI), the International Personality Disorder Examination Screening questionnaire (IPDE-S) and the consultant Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition-text revision (DSM IV-TR) instruments in medical wards in Jamaica is significantly higher than the prevalence rate of studies in other countries. The prevalence rate identified by the IPDE-S was significantly higher that the local instruments used.
  • TMR Changoor, G Hutchinson
    Type D personality was investigated in persons with selfreported cardiovascular disease in a Trinidadian cardiac population. Forty-two per cent of participants were identified as Type D as compared to 26% of participants who did not report having a cardiovascular illness.
  • FW Hickling
    The study uses historiography in the analysis of the contemporary fictional writings of a Jamaican novelist to identify aspects of psychopathology of Jamaican people. The analysis reveals profound personality disorder scotoma that currently paralyses many Jamaicans as a product of the enslavement of Africans in the New World, which has been labelled ‘Shakatani’ by current Caribbean medical scholarship.
  • H Belli, S Belli, C Ural, M Akbudak, MF Oktay, EF Akyuz Cim, A Tabo, M Umar, B Pehlivan
    An assessment of detailed psychopathological aspects and psychiatric co-morbities could help to define the clinical profile of people requesting cosmetic rhinoplasty in cosmetic surgery settings. Research into these factors is essential to detect crucial problems such as personality disorders and body dysmorphic disorder before surgery.
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