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Between Two Grammars: Research and Practice for Language Learning and Teaching in a Creole-speaking Environment, edited by Beverley Bryan,

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SKU: cje-32-2-8

The title of a book is an extremely important detail that can be a deterrent or a compelling force as to whether a reader chooses a book or passes it by. As I laid hold of the text, the first aspect of it that drew my attention was the very title which I believe is most fitting, Between Two Grammars: Research and Practice for Language Learning and Teaching in a Creole-speaking Environment. The title sets the stage as I assumed that the central issue of the book had to do with two languages that have two distinct grammatical structures.

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Caribbean Language as Represented in the Caribbean Journal of Education

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SKU: cje-32-1-2

Several articles on the Caribbean language situation and its implications for Caribbean education in general, and the teaching of English in particular, have appeared in the Caribbean Journal of Education during the 35 years of its existence. They reflect recognition of Creoles as real languages and also increasing appreciation of them as symbols of culture and national identity. One manifestation of this is a relatively positive attitude to the use of these vernaculars in the classroom, in one way or another, alongside the co-existent European language.

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Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago, by L. Winer

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SKU: cje-31-2-8

The appearance of Lise Winer’s dictionary is the single most important event in the study of language in Trinidad and Tobago since 1869. In that year, John Jacob Thomas published his classic, The theory and practice of Creole grammar. That volume provided the first attempt at a comprehensive grammatical description of a French lexicon Creole anywhere in the world. It made the study of language behaviour in Trinidad and Tobago an area of referential attention for scholars in the field of Creole linguistics.

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Education Issues in Creole and Creole-influenced Vernacular Contexts, edited by Ian Robertson and Hazel Simmons-McDonald

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SKU: cje-36-1-2-9

Cultural syncretisation and racial miscegenation have given birth to the Caribbean as a Creole space. The Creole dialect, a source of contention, has, for decades, remained basilectal while English preponderates in the classrooms. With this reality, several obstacles continue to surface, giving rise to the question of which language should be officialized in classrooms. Dennis Craig, Caribbean linguist, with decades of experience, pioneered work to institutionalize the vernacular in schools.

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The Language Learning Aptitudes of Jamaican Children at the Beginning of Secondary School

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SKU: cje-3-2-1

Part one of the present paper (presented in Vol. 3 No. 1 of this journal) discussed the need for a study of language aptitudes in the Jamaican context and the relevance of J.B. Carroll's theories in the latter respect. The performance of children in tests of language aptitudes and learning potential was studied, and it was suggested that differences in the social-class profiles of schools were related to differences in the average test-scores of those schools. 

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Phonological Variation in the Jamaican Continuum by Glenn A. Akers, Karoma Publishers, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1981.

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SKU: cje-8-3-5

Jamaica Creole has been more thoroughly analysed than any other Caribbean vernacular with the possible exception of Haitian Creole. The book under review is a worthy successor to Beryl Bailey's Jamaican Creole Syntax (1966) in that, at the very least, it may be considered to have accomplished for the sound structure of the Creole what that earlier book did for its sentence structure. Indeed, it might justifiably be said to have done far more.

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Creare: Re-imagining the Poetics and Politics of the Jamaican Creole Language Debates

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SKU: cje-20-1-7

This paper takes up the Jamaican Creole/Standard English (JC/SE) debates and argues that they often reproduce false binaries between Creole and English and the oral and written. I map out some of their terrain by sampling editorials and letters from local newspapers, the Gleaner and the Observer, and offer up a brief history of the various positions of linguists and educators on the SE/JC question.

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Role Playing and Second Dialect Teaching in the West Indies

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SKU: cje-2-2

In this paper one specific technique for developing language proficiency in our pupils will be discussed. This technique, role playing, has been found by this writer to be uniquely suited to fostering the development of the many kinds of language skills and attitudes to variations in language use, which our pupils need in order to function confidently in our peculiar language situation.

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Foreign Language Teaching: A Plea for New Objectives

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SKU: cje-2-2

The concern of West Indian educators for improvement in language-teaching methods and materials has been for the most part confined to the problem of teaching Standard English. Research seeks to determine the differences between Creole and Standard English, the nature of the post-Creole continuum, if it exists, and the effects of the vernacular on proficiency in learning the standard or, through it, other subjects.

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