Close Menu

gender

The Value Attached to Education by Jamaican Secondary School Students: Gender and School Type Differences

$10.00
SKU: CJE-41-1

This study sought to determine whether there are significant gender and school type differences in the value that Jamaican secondary school students attach to education. Data was collected from 368 students from nine secondary schools and analysed using descriptive statistics, and independent sample T-tests. The results revealed that the students valued education for instrumental purposes and their value of education was moderately low. There were significant gender and school type differences in the value they attached to education.

List price: Free
Price: $10.00

Streaming and its Effects on Boys and Girls in Secondary Schools in Jamaica

Free
SKU: JEDIC-0301

The paper reports results of research on the effects of streaming on boys and girls in secondary schools in Jamaica. The study found that girls were more represented in high stream classes, while boys were more represented in low stream classes. Streaming affected academic achievement, students' experiences of school practices such as being beaten or insulted, and students' sense of alienation from school. There were gender differences in all responses, with low stream boys most likely to do poorly academically and to experience negative school practices.

List price: Free
Price: Free

Gender, Literacy, and Language Learning in Jamaica: Considerations from the Literature

Free
SKU: cje 24-1-2

Research in education in Jamaica has increasingly pointed to gender as a critical factor in achievement. Early research focused on the continuing disparities between options available to women as opposed to men (LeoRhynie 1987; Hamilton 1987). More recently the focus has been on the perceived underachievement of male pupils and students, manifested in the work of Miller (1991) and Chevannes (1999), where the performance of boys across the school sector has come under scrutiny.

List price: Free
Price: Free

Gender and Democratization of Caribbean Education

Free
SKU: cje 26-3

In the Commonwealth Caribbean, on average, girls start schooling earlier, attend school more regularly, repeat fewer grades, are less likely to drop out and therefore stay in school longer, and achieve higher standards of educational performance than boys. In the adult population more women are literate than men. Girls are more highly represented in those sections of the secondary and tertiary levels of the education system which enhance the prospects of upward social mobility. In a real sense girls and women constitute the first sex in Caribbean education.

List price: Free
Price: Free

Mothering for Schooling, by Alison I. Griffith and Dorothy E. Smith

Free
SKU: cje 27-1-5

This book employs an institutional ethnographic mode of inquiry to examine how organizational structures influence the everyday activities of mothers in the process of schooling. It examines the extent to which parents’ work or involvement in schooling contributes to overall level of academic achievement of their children and the educational work performed in schools. The research provides a comparative analysis of the level or quality of involvement that is contributed to the maintenance of school practices by middle-class and lower-class mothers.

List price: Free
Price: Free

School Failure and Success: A Gender Analysis of the 1997 General Proficiency Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) Examinations for Jamaica

Free
SKU: jedic 4-1-1

In this paper the 1997 results of the CXC examinations for Jamaica are analysed in an effort to determine male-female patterns of participation and performance. Data were obtained and scrutinised in terms of male-female differences in a two stage analysis. Firstly, differences were examined for: the overall total of thirty-six (36) subjects and then for each of the sixteen(16) academic and twenty (20) technical-vocational subjects. At the second stage, differences were examined for: coeducational and single-sex schools, and school types.

List price: Free
Price: Free

Secondary School Stratification, Gender, And Other Determinants of Academic Achievement in Barbados

Free
SKU: jedic 5-2-1

The alleged underachievement of males within the educational system has become the subject of ongoing debate in both academic and lay circles in the Commonwealth Caribbean. The present study sought to build on the Commonwealth Caribbean research literature by (1) providing a longitudinal analysis of the performance of a representative sample of 16-year-old boys and girls in secondary schools in Barbados, (2) putting forward non-gendered explanations for the performance of the 263 students in the sample, and (3) estimating the relative contribution to variations in performance of a number of

List price: Free
Price: Free

Not All Males Underachieve! Evaluating Gender Differentials in Academic Achievement at a Medical School

Free
SKU: jedic 6-4

This study sought to determine the magnitude and direction of achievement gender differentials at the UWI medical school in St. Augustine. This tertiary institution provides a unique opportunity to investigate gender differentials in the English-speaking Caribbean because males and females are self-selected and equally matched in ability. The study is set in the context of a variety of innovative teaching-learning strategies, assessment modes, and disciplines throughout an extended 5-year programme. Data for 9 years (graduating class 1994 to 2002) were collated and analyzed.

List price: Free
Price: Free

Effects of lecturer, teacher, demonstrations, practical work and discussion on Jamaican fourth-graders' attitudes to science and knowledge of machines and water

Free
SKU: jedic 7-3

This study investigated whether or not the involvement of some primary school students in practical work, to supplement their being taught by a combination of the lecture method, teacher's demonstrations and class discussions, significantly improved their attitudes to science and their knowledge of machines and water. The sample comprised 180 Jamaican 4th-graders in two urban primary schools. Attitudes to science questionnaire and knowledge of machines and water test (KMWT) were used to collect data.

List price: Free
Price: Free

Gender and Geography: A Study of Selected Jamaican Schools

Free
SKU: jedic 10-2-2

This research undertook a cross-sectional evaluation of students' and teachers' views on how gender influences the teaching and learning of geography. The sample comprised secondary and post-secondary educational institutions in both rural and urban settings. The research found that the influence of teachers' gender on geography is quite distinct. When the teacher was male, the subject seemed more scientific and hence more difficult. When the teacher was female, the subject required more analysis and seemed easier to female students.

List price: $5.00
Price: Free

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - gender
Top of Page