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Epidemiology of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci Isolated from Clinical Blood Specimens at the University Hospital of the West Indies

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Pages: 
170–3

ABSTRACT

The prevalence and significance of coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) isolated from blood cultures at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) during a six-month period were investigated. Standard and automated microbiological procedures were used to process 3001 blood culture specimens received from 2363 patients and 658 (21.9%) of the blood cultures yielded 854 bacterial isolates. The highest prevalence of positive blood cultures (60%) and the lowest prevalence of blood isolates of CoNS (12%) were found in the intensive care unit (ICU). The blood isolates of CoNS were most frequent in the surgical wards (13%) and lowest in obstetrics and gynaecology (2%). High rates of resistance to methicillin, other anti-staphylococcal penicillins, and cephalosporins used in the treatment of CoNS were observed. All blood isolates of CoNS (100%) were susceptible to vancomycin. In conclusion, the results show that coagulase-negative staphylococci are the most prevalent bacterial isolates in blood cultures at the UHWI occurring mostly as contaminants. The practice of proper venepuncture and hand-washing techniques by medical staff are recommended to facilitate appropriate antibiotic usage.

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e-Published: 10 Jun, 2013
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