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Effect of Long Term Supplementation of Tomatoes (Cooked) on Levels of Antioxidant Enzymes, Lipid Peroxidation Rate, Lipid Profile and Glycated Haemoglobin in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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274–8

ABSTRACT

The objective of the present study is to evaluate the beneficial effect of tomatoes, which are a rich source of lycopene, a relatively new carotenoid known to play an important role in human health. In this study, the lipid peroxidation rate was investigated by estimating malondialdehyde (TBARS) levels of antioxidant enzymes like SOD, GSH-Px, GR, GSH, lipid profile, which includes total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, and glycated haemoglobin HbA1c in (n = 40) the Type 2 diabetic group (n = 40) and an age-matched control group (n = 50). Significantly lower levels of antioxidant enzymes and very high lipid peroxidation rate in the Type 2 diabetic group were observed when compared to controls (p < 0.001). Likewise, significantly higher levels of lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in the diabetic group were observed when compared with control (p < 0.001). Long term tomato supplementation in diabetes mellitus showed a significant improvement in the levels of antioxidant enzymes and decreased lipid peroxidation rate (p < 0.001), but there were no significant changes in lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin HbA1c levels (p > 0.10). These findings suggest that tomato lycopene may have considerable therapeutic potential as an antioxidant but there was no significant lipid lowering effect in Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

e-Published: 12 Jun, 2013

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