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environment

Multidrug Resistant Organisms in the Intensive Care Unit of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Jamaica

DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2018.089
Pages: 
Synopsis: 
This article looks at the detection of multidrug resistant (MDR) on clinical and non-clinical surfaces of the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) of a tertiary care hospital post detection of an outbreak or endemic strain of similar pathogens in patient samples. The aim was to highlight the potential role of the environment as a possible reservoir for organisms and underscore the importance of infection control strategies in breaking the chain of infection.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogenic bacteria in the environment of the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) a tertiary care hospital in Jamaica.  This was done to find out if organisms previously associated with outbreaks are present and to make recommendations as appropriate, for infection prevention and control measures.

Accepted: 
15 Jun, 2018
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 27 Feb, 2019

Disclaimer

Manuscripts that are Published Ahead of Print have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of the West Indian Medical Journal. They may appear in their original format and may not be copy edited or formatted in the style guide of this Journal. While accepted manuscripts are not yet assigned a volume, issue or page numbers, they can be cited using the DOI and date of e-publication. See our Instructions for Authors on how to properly cite manuscripts at this stage. The contents of the manuscript may change before it is published in its final form. Manuscripts in this section will be removed once they have been issued to a volume and issue, but will still retain the DOI and date of e-publication.

Toward Understanding the Biology of Crime in Trinidad and Tobago

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2013.297
Pages: 
655–7
Synopsis: 
Crime has a distinct biological component; addressing this aspect could lead toward clinical interventions that could mitigate the incidence of crime within the population.

 ABSTRACT

Serious crime is a scourge within Trinidad and Tobago’s borders and seems to be escalating yearly with no resolution in sight. It is commonplace for governments to view/implement policies targeting crime based on sociological and psychological paradigms. What is most often overlooked, however, is that crime has unique biological underpinnings, which, if characterized, could lead toward clinical interventions that could mitigate its incidence within the population.  

Accepted: 
26 Nov, 2013
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
Journal Authors: 
e-Published: 03 Jul, 2014
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