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T McCartney

Tracking Medical Graduates in Jamaica and The Bahamas

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2018.029
Pages: 
47-52
Synopsis: 
In Jamaica and The Bahamas, there were 1079 medical graduates between 2012 and 2016; 69% of them were female. All graduates obtained internship posts, mainly in public hospitals. Of the 2259 applicants, 664 were accepted to postgraduate programmes. Seventy per cent of all graduates were working in the English-speaking Caribbean.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the availability of employment and retention for the increased number of medical graduates in Jamaica and The Bahamas.

Methods: The availability of internships and junior medical posts for graduates of The University of the West Indies in Jamaica and The Bahamas over the five-year period of 2012 to 2016 was reviewed.

Accepted: 
11 Apr, 2018
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 26 Feb, 2019

The Jamaica Injury Surveillance System A Profile of the Intentional and Unintentional Injuries in Jamaican Hospitals

Issue: 
Pages: 
7–13
Synopsis: 
Injuries in Jamaica are a major public health problem. Causes of unintentional injuries were falls, lacerations and blunt injuries. Motor vehicle related injuries were in motorcars, riding motorbikes/bicycles or as pedestrians. Violence-related injuries were mostly fights with acquaintances using sharp objects to inflict injury.

ABSTRACT

Background: Injuries in Jamaica are a major public health problem as demonstrated by a hospital based computerized injury surveillance system established in 1999 that provides a risk profile for injuries.

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e-Published: 01 Oct, 2013

Jaundice Post Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

Issue: 
Pages: 
88–91

ABSTRACT

In just over 20 years, laparoscopic cholecystectomy has emerged as the standard therapy for cholelithiasis and is now being performed with increased safety. However, an uncommon complication of this technique has been jaundice even in patients without iatrogenic bile duct injury. We report on two cases where this complication occurred and review the literature on this topic.

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 01 Oct, 2013

Results of an Exercise to Estimate the Costs of Interpersonal Violence in Jamaica

Issue: 
Pages: 
446–52
Synopsis: 
During 2006, direct medical cost of injuries due to interpersonal violence accounted for nearly 12% of Jamaica’s total health expenditure while productivity losses due to interpersonal violencerelated injuries accounted for approximately 160% of Jamaica’s total health expenditure or four per cent of gross domestic product.

ABSTRACT

This report describes the application of a draft version of the World Health Organization (WHO)/ United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Manual for estimating the economic costs of injuries due to interpersonal and self-directed violence to measure costs of injuries from interpersonal violence.

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 20 Sep, 2013
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