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G Legall

Evaluative Research on Pharmacist-managed Diabetes Care: Focus on Self-monitoring of Blood Glucose

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2015.529
Pages: 
101–107
Synopsis: 
This pharmacist evaluative research study (PHARMERS) sought to empower pharmacists to assist in the management of poorly-controlled, diabetic patients. We hoped to demonstrate that patients stand a better chance of achieving improved glycaemic control if closely monitored by a pharmacist.

Abstract

Objective: Pharmacists have not demonstrated the ability to manage chronic diseases such as Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, which is an ongoing problem in Trinidad and Tobago. The primary objective was to demonstrate that pharmacists can assist patients to achieve at least a 1% decrease in HbA1c.

Accepted: 
17 Nov, 2015
Journal Sections: 
Journal Authors: 
e-Published: 15 Mar, 2016

A Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Study of the Issues of Climate Change/Variability Impacts and Public Health in Trinidad and Tobago, and St Kitts and Nevis

Issue: 
Pages: 
115–21
Synopsis: 
A survey was conducted in Trinidad and Tobago and in St Kitts and Nevis to determine the levels of understanding of the issues of climate variability/change affecting dengue fever (DF) and its transmission. Climate variability issues such as seasonal variation affecting DF and its vector production are well apprciated, but use of this information in an early warning programme to prevent DF transmission are not yet in use by the communities.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the level of understanding of the issues of climate change (CC)/variability (CV) and public health by populations of St Kitts and Nevis (SKN) and Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) and to find whether respondents would be willing to incorporate these values into strategies for dengue fever (DF) prevention.

PDF Attachment: 
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e-Published: 01 Jul, 2013

Mortality Trends and Potential Years of Life Lost in the English and Dutchspeaking Caribbean, 1985–2000

Issue: 
Pages: 
122–31
Synopsis: 
During the period 1985–2000, while there was an overall 5% decrease in age-adjusted mortality rates in the English and Dutchspeaking Caribbean islands, there was an increase in mortality due to non-communicable diseases, AIDS and assaults (homicides).


ABSTRACT

Objective: To describe mortality trends and potential years of life lost (PYLL) due to leading causes of death in 21 Caribbean countries during 1985, 1990, 1995 and 2000.

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
Keywords: 
e-Published: 18 Jul, 2013
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