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N Meeks-Aitken

Clinicopathological Features of Colorectal Cancer at the Extremes of Age

DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2016.443
Pages: 
Synopsis: 
CRC in the young and elderly patients is not uncommon. Patients present with locally advanced disease and similar clinicopathological features to patients of a screenable age, emphasizing the importance of clinical vigilance if we are going to diagnose and treat these patients in a timely manner.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the clinicopathological features of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) at the extremes of age and compare differences across the younger and older age groups.

Accepted: 
24 Mar, 2017
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e-Published: 18 May, 2017

Disclaimer

Manuscripts that are Published Ahead of Print have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of the West Indian Medical Journal. They may appear in their original format and may not be copy edited or formatted in the style guide of this Journal. While accepted manuscripts are not yet assigned a volume, issue or page numbers, they can be cited using the DOI and date of e-publication. See our Instructions for Authors on how to properly cite manuscripts at this stage. The contents of the manuscript may change before it is published in its final form. Manuscripts in this section will be removed once they have been issued to a volume and issue, but will still retain the DOI and date of e-publication.

Trauma: The Burden of a Preventable Problem

Issue: 
Pages: 
26–8
Synopsis: 
Jamaica Trauma Registry data analysis shows that the majority of hospitalized patients were males suffering from penetrating trauma. Their care were largely state funded.

ABSTRACT

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e-Published: 01 Oct, 2013

Transfer of Head-injured Patients in Jamaica: Is there a Problem?

Issue: 
Pages: 
220–24
Synopsis: 
The transfer of head-injured patients, many with multiple injuries, is not being performed in a manner consistent with modern medical practice. There is urgent need for implementation of a standardized protocol for the transfer of such patients in Jamaica.

ABSTRACT

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e-Published: 05 Jun, 2013

The Aetiology of Head Injury in Admitted Patients in Jamaica

Issue: 
Pages: 
223–5
Synopsis: 
Head injury in admitted patients is mainly due to road traffic accidents, falls and interpersonal violence. More effective prevention strategies including education and law enforcement are urgently warranted.

ABSTRACT

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e-Published: 02 Jul, 2013

Surgical and Intensive Care needs of Head-injured Patients Transferred to the University Hospital of the West Indies

Issue: 
Synopsis: 
The majority of transferred head-injured patients sustained mild injuries with a third requiring surgical procedures and 19% requiring Intensive Care Unit care. Appropriate educational, training and transfer programmes and transfer policies must be implemented to minimize inappropriate transfers.

ABSTRACT

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e-Published: 02 Jul, 2013

Pre-published Manuscript

This manuscript has been assigned to a volume and issue but has not yet been published. It is either being edited, typeset or is in the proof stage of publication.
In the pre-published stage, this manuscript may contain statements, opinions, and information that have errors in facts, figures, or interpretation. Any final changes in this manuscript will be made at the time of publication and will be reflected in the final electronic version of the issue. The editors and authors and their respective employees are not responsible or liable for the use of any such inaccurate or misleading data, opinion or information contained in the articles in this section.

Trauma in the Developing World: The Jamaican Experience

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2013.318
Pages: 
267–70
Synopsis: 
Trauma remains a challenging burden on the often under-funded healthcare systems of developing countries. Ten-year data from the Jamaica Trauma Registry shows that trauma accounts for 20% of surgical admissions, with 5% mortality. There is a good opportunity for various preventive programmes to be instituted to reduce the burden of this disease.
 

ABSTRACT

Trauma remains a challenging burden on the often under-funded healthcare systems of developing countries. Ten-year data from the Jamaica Trauma Registry show that trauma accounts for 20% of surgical admissions, with close to 50% being intentional and with a 5% mortality. There is a good opportunity for various preventive programmes to be instituted to reduce the burden of this disease.

Accepted: 
11 Dec, 2013
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Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 12 Jun, 2014

Colonoscopy in Central Jamaica: Results and Implications

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2011.170
Pages: 
610–4
Synopsis: 
A review of the outcome of 1250 colonoscopies performed in central Jamaica reveals adequate caecal cannulation rate, but a perforation rate of 0.24%. Ten per cent of the patients had cancer diagnosed at colonoscopy, while a similar number had adenomas.

ABSTRACT

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e-Published: 24 Jan, 2013
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