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obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

An Investigation of Serum Magnesium and Red Blood Cell Distribution Width Values in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2017.153
Synopsis: 
The study investigated the serum levels of magnesium and red blood cell distribution width (RDW) values and their relationship with polysomnographic parameters in patients with OSAS. Serum RDW values were significantly elevated and magnesium levels were significantly decreased in OSAS. Also, RDW was positively and magnesium was negatively correlated with polysomnographic parameters. To our knowledge, this was the first study investigating the association between RDW and Mg levels in the same patient population.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) leads to complications in several systems. The purpose of this study was to examine serum magnesium and red cell distribution width (RDW) values in OSAS, a chronic inflammation, and thus to reveal the relations between these two parameters and with other sleep parameters.

Accepted: 
20 Dec, 2017
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 22 Dec, 2017

Disclaimer

Manuscripts that are Published Ahead of Print have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of the West Indian Medical Journal. They may appear in their original format and may not be copy edited or formatted in the style guide of this Journal. While accepted manuscripts are not yet assigned a volume, issue or page numbers, they can be cited using the DOI and date of e-publication. See our Instructions for Authors on how to properly cite manuscripts at this stage. The contents of the manuscript may change before it is published in its final form. Manuscripts in this section will be removed once they have been issued to a volume and issue, but will still retain the DOI and date of e-publication.

Pediatric Severe OSAHS with a Funnel Chest

DOI: 
10.7727/WIMJ.2016.416

 

ABSTRACT

Accepted: 
07 Sep, 2016
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 20 Sep, 2016

Disclaimer

Manuscripts that are Published Ahead of Print have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of the West Indian Medical Journal. They may appear in their original format and may not be copy edited or formatted in the style guide of this Journal. While accepted manuscripts are not yet assigned a volume, issue or page numbers, they can be cited using the DOI and date of e-publication. See our Instructions for Authors on how to properly cite manuscripts at this stage. The contents of the manuscript may change before it is published in its final form. Manuscripts in this section will be removed once they have been issued to a volume and issue, but will still retain the DOI and date of e-publication.

The Relation of Polysomnographic Parameters to Carotid and Brachial Artery Intima-media Thickness in Patients with Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2016.225
Synopsis: 
In the present report we investigated whether the effect of intermittent and continuous hypoxia on carotid and brachial artery intima-media thicknesses (IMTs) is similar. We showed that both intermittent and continuous hypoxia result in remarkable alterations in carotid-IMT and brachial-IMT.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate carotid (C) and brachial (BA) artery intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) along with factors predicting CIMT and BA-IMT increase.

Accepted: 
15 Jun, 2016
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 21 Jul, 2016

Disclaimer

Manuscripts that are Published Ahead of Print have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of the West Indian Medical Journal. They may appear in their original format and may not be copy edited or formatted in the style guide of this Journal. While accepted manuscripts are not yet assigned a volume, issue or page numbers, they can be cited using the DOI and date of e-publication. See our Instructions for Authors on how to properly cite manuscripts at this stage. The contents of the manuscript may change before it is published in its final form. Manuscripts in this section will be removed once they have been issued to a volume and issue, but will still retain the DOI and date of e-publication.

Vascular Endothelial Dysfunction Caused by Oxidative Stress is a Predictor Factor for Complications of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2015.383
Synopsis: 
We aimed to determine oxidative imbalance and vascular endothelial dysfunction as suspects for complications of OSAS. We found both oxidative stress and vascular endothelial dysfunction lead to early development of atherosclerosis which may cause the life-threatening complications of OSAS.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction that occur during sleep which leads to cardiovascular, neurovascular and metabolic diseases. The mechanisms of complications in these patients are unclear. In this report, we aimed to determine the cause of oxidative imbalance in patients with OSAS and to evaluate the vascular endothelial dysfunction as a suspect for complications of the disease.

Accepted: 
10 Sep, 2015
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 15 Feb, 2016

Disclaimer

Manuscripts that are Published Ahead of Print have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of the West Indian Medical Journal. They may appear in their original format and may not be copy edited or formatted in the style guide of this Journal. While accepted manuscripts are not yet assigned a volume, issue or page numbers, they can be cited using the DOI and date of e-publication. See our Instructions for Authors on how to properly cite manuscripts at this stage. The contents of the manuscript may change before it is published in its final form. Manuscripts in this section will be removed once they have been issued to a volume and issue, but will still retain the DOI and date of e-publication.

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