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A Nicholson

16S rRNA Methyltransferases in Clinical Gram-negative Bacilli from a Tertiary Care Hospital in the Caribbean

DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2018.131
Pages: 
Synopsis: 
16S rRNA methyltransferase enzymes pose an iminent threat to the availability of aminoglycosides as an emipiric therapeutic option for Gram negative bacterial infections. Their presence in the Caribbean therfore further burdens this resource limited region.

ABSTRACT

 

Objective: 16S rRNA methyltransferase enzymes or RMT confer pan-resistance to the aminoglycoside class of antibiotics. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli with these methyltransferase genes have been identified from clinical settings in Europe, Asia and the Americas. This study reports their detection and characterization in Jamaican Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli.

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e-Published: 08 Mar, 2019

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Manuscripts that are Published Ahead of Print have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of the West Indian Medical Journal. They may appear in their original format and may not be copy edited or formatted in the style guide of this Journal. While accepted manuscripts are not yet assigned a volume, issue or page numbers, they can be cited using the DOI and date of e-publication. See our Instructions for Authors on how to properly cite manuscripts at this stage. The contents of the manuscript may change before it is published in its final form. Manuscripts in this section will be removed once they have been issued to a volume and issue, but will still retain the DOI and date of e-publication.

A Survey of Physicians’ Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Antimicrobial Resistance and Antibiotic Prescribing Practices at the University Hospital of the West Indies

Issue: 
Pages: 
165–70
Synopsis: 
Most physicians considered antibiotic resistance an extremely important problem globally, but less so nationally. Contributory factors were correctly identified, but antibiotic prescribing practice did not incorporate measures to reduce resistance. Hand-washing was not considered to be important in reducing resistance and de-escalation to narrow spectrum antibiotics when appropriate was not a regular practice.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To identify physicians’ knowledge and attitudes regarding antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic prescribing practices at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI).

Methods: A cross-sectional survey of physicians at the UHWI was conducted between September 2008 and April 2009 using a 28-item, self-administered questionnaire. Eligible physicians from several specialities were identified from departmental rotas.

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e-Published: 02 Oct, 2013

Urinary Tract Infection in Neonates with Serious Bacterial Infections Admitted to the University Hospital of the West Indies

Issue: 
Pages: 
101–05
Synopsis: 
Urinary tract infection is an important cause of serious bacterial infection in neonates affecting 1 in 3 babies with proven bacterial infection and may be the first indicator of underlying structural abnormalities. The absence of specific distinguishing clinical features makes it necessary to include urine cultures in the sepsis evaluation of neonates presenting with symptoms suggestive of sepsis.


ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of urinary tract infection in neonates, with serious bacterial infections, admitted to the University Hospital of the West Indies.

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e-Published: 18 Jul, 2013

A Review of Clostridium difficile Infection at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2014.180
Pages: 
413–8
Synopsis: 
Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) per total stool samples and per total admissions increased at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica. Although most cases were nosocomial, there was a greater than expected frequency of community acquired CDI. Ceftazidime was the most common antibiotic associated with CDI.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study examined the frequency of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) among hospital admission and diarrhoeal stool samples over a six-year period.

Accepted: 
11 Aug, 2014
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e-Published: 04 May, 2015

Aminoglycoside Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Gram Negative Bacilli at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica: Comparison of Two Time Periods

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2014.040
Pages: 
87–91
Synopsis: 
Aminoglycosides have been in use at the University Hospital of The West Indies for over 30 years. This report answers the question of their continued usefulness by comparing current resistance rates with previously collected data.

ABSTRACT

Accepted: 
28 Feb, 2014
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e-Published: 12 Feb, 2015

Febrile Neutropaenia in Cancer Patients

Issue: 
Pages: 
209–14
Synopsis: 
Gram-negative organisms are the predominant isolates in febrile neutropaenic episodes in this cohort of patients. Non-neutropaenic patients had an increased mortality with an increase in Acinetobacter infections and multiple infections.

ABSTRACT

Backgrounds: Febrile neutropaenia is a common complication of chemotherapy in cancer patients.
Empirical antibiotic regimes are based on the epidemiological characteristics of bacterial isolates globally and locally.

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e-Published: 02 Oct, 2013

The Epidemiology of Fungaemia at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica

Issue: 
Pages: 
580–4
Synopsis: 
Candida species are an important cause of fungaemia internationally. At the University Hospital of the West Indies, non-albicans Candida spp were found to be more commonly isolated than Candida albicans as a cause of fungaemia. Cryptococcus spp was also identified as a causative agent of infection. Systematic surveillance is necessary to detect emerging trends and guide empirical antifungal therapy.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To determine the epidemiology of fungaemia at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) as well as the incidence of fungaemia at the UHWI over a four-year period.

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e-Published: 20 Sep, 2013
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