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GR Serjeant

A Note on the Prevalence of Impaternity in Jamaica

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2016.546
Pages: 
521

 The Editor,

 Sir,

Genetics studies often depend on the certainty of correct genotypes in both parents.  In Jamaica, it is common knowledge that some fathers may not be the true biological father but the prevalence of impaternity is not published because of the difficulties and expense of determining the biological fathers by DNA studies.

Accepted: 
03 Jul, 2017
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e-Published: 03 Jul, 2017

Jamaica and Research in Sickle Cell Disease

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2016.547
Pages: 
457–68
Synopsis: 
Many developments have occurred in sickle cell disease and care over the last 50 years in Jamaica. The clinic population grew from 50–60 in the mid-1960s to 5500 in late 1999. During this period, the number of staff serving sickle cell patients increased from 2 to 28, comprising physicians, paediatricians, nurses, laboratory technologists, social workers, computer staff and statisticians. The physical facilities have improved greatly, and data management has evolved from the type written long narrow paper strips in the late 1960s to sophisticated electronic patient management systems. The many physical resources and the superb opportunities of an ‘island laboratory’ have pro-vided a unique basis for clinical research into the disease.

ABSTRACT

Accepted: 
03 Jul, 2017
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e-Published: 03 Jul, 2017

Newborn Screening for Sickle Cell Disease: Jamaican Experience

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2015.492
Pages: 
18–26
Synopsis: 
The history and evolution of laboratory technology for newborn screening for sickle cell disease is reviewed with particular reference to Jamaica. The procedures and results of screening 54 566 newborns from southern and western Jamaica are presented.

ABSTRACT

Objectives:  To review the history of newborn screening for sickle cell disease with especial reference to Jamaica.

Methods: A summary of the history, the development of associated laboratory technology and the implementation of newborn screening for sickle cell disease in Jamaica.

Accepted: 
22 Sep, 2015
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e-Published: 22 Sep, 2015

Counselling Mothers of Babies with the Sickle Cell Trait: To Be or Not to Be

Issue: 
Pages: 
249–50

ABSTRACT

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e-Published: 29 Jan, 2014

Jamaica, the Caribbean and Sickle Cell Disease

Issue: 
Pages: 
331–7
Synopsis: 
The development of research interests in sickle cell disease has been traced from the first recorded case, the founding of the University Hospital of the West Indies and the Jamaica Sickle Cell Unit with its worldwide influence on clinical practice in this disease.

ABSTRACT

The development of research interests in sickle cell disease has been traced from the first recorded case, the founding of the University Hospital of the West Indies and the Jamaican Sickle Cell Unit with its influence on clinical practice in this disease worldwide.

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e-Published: 21 Aug, 2013

Growth Curves for Normal Jamaican Neonates

Issue: 
Pages: 
368–74
Synopsis: 
This study provides ethnic- and gender-specific growth curves for the Jamaican newborn and is based on the most extensive data-set currently available in Jamaica for babies of West African descent.

ABSTRACT

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e-Published: 17 Jun, 2013

Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease in Uganda And Jamaica: A Comparison of Bantu and Benin Haplotypes

DOI: 
Doi:10.7727/wimj.2012.167

Objective: To compare the haematological and clinical features of homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease in Bantu and Benin haplotypes in a cross-sectional study of 115 Ugandan patients attending the Sickle Cell Clinic at Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, with 311 patients in the Jamaican Cohort Study.

Methods: This involved the comparison of clinical features and haematology with special reference to genetic determinants of severity including fetal haemoglobin levels, beta-globin haplotype, and alpha thalassaemia status.

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e-Published: 15 Feb, 2013

Pre-published Manuscript

This manuscript has been assigned to a volume and issue but has not yet been published. It is either being edited, typeset or is in the proof stage of publication.
In the pre-published stage, this manuscript may contain statements, opinions, and information that have errors in facts, figures, or interpretation. Any final changes in this manuscript will be made at the time of publication and will be reflected in the final electronic version of the issue. The editors and authors and their respective employees are not responsible or liable for the use of any such inaccurate or misleading data, opinion or information contained in the articles in this section.

Perinatal Factors in Students Admitted to The University of the West Indies Data from the Jamaican Perinatal Study

Issue: 
Pages: 
295–9
Synopsis: 
University students were more likely to come from smaller families with features indicative of better quality of life.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To compare perinatal and social factors in students admitted to The University of the West Indies (UWI), Kingston, Jamaica, at age 18 years with those in the rest of the Jamaican Perinatal Cohort.

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e-Published: 07 Oct, 2013

Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease in Uganda and Jamaica: A Comparison of Bantu and Benin Haplotypes

Issue: 
DOI: 
Doi:10.7727/wimj.2012.167
Pages: 
684–91
Synopsis: 
Comparison of the Bantu and Benin haplotypes in Ugandan and Jamaican patients with homozygous sickle cell disease reveal some clinical and haemato-logical differences. Better documentation is needed to derive optimal models of care for Ugandan patients.

ABSTRACT

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e-Published: 01 Mar, 2013
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