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ND Duncan

Sickle Cell Disease and Elective Cholecystectomy

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2018.192
Pages: 
3–9

ABSTRACT

Accepted: 
08 Dec, 2018
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 25 Mar, 2019

Risk Factors and Prevention of Paediatric Burns in Jamaica

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2015.015
Pages: 
128–131
Synopsis: 
Burn injuries are a leading cause of paediatric admissions worldwide, with the majority of cases being preventable. This study analyses the underlying causes of paediatric burn injuries in Jamaican children in an effort to establish local preventive measures.

ABSTRACT

Accepted: 
05 Feb, 2015
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 14 Oct, 2015

Male Circumcision and the Caribbean HIV Epidemic

Issue: 
Pages: 
348–50
Synopsis: 
Advantages attributed to male circumcision include protection against a range of sexually transmitted diseases. The frequency of HIV transmission from females to males has been found to be reduced by male circumcision in regions of Sub-Saharan Africa. The relevance of these data to the Caribbean is explored.

INTRODUCTION

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Journal Sections: 
Journal Authors: 
e-Published: 07 Oct, 2013

Conjoined Twins: Bioethics, Medicine and the Law

Issue: 
Pages: 
123–24
Synopsis: 
Clinicians managing conjoined twins find themselves at a crossroad where bioethics, medicine and law converge.
INTRODUCTION
 
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 06 Feb, 2014

New Rotavirus Vaccines for Infant Gastroenteritis Arriving Soon

Issue: 
Pages: 
1–3
Synopsis: 
Rotavirus gastroenteritis is the second most common disease of infants and young children. Each year, rotavirus causes approximately 111 million episodes of gastroenteritis requiring only home care, 25 million clinic visits, 2 million hospitalizations, and 352 000 – 592 000 deaths (median, 440 000 deaths) in children < 5 years of age, worldwide (1). By age five years, nearly every child will have an episode of rotavirus gastroenteritis, 1 in 5 will visit a clinic, 1 in 65 will be hospitalized, and approximately 1 in 293 will die (1). Children in the poorest countries account for 82% of rotavirus deaths. The most prevalent rotavirus serotypes which are responsible for over 80% of worldwide gastroenteritis infections are G1[P8], G2[P4], G3[P8] and G4[P8] (2). A previously licensed rotavirus vaccine in the United States of America was withdrawn from the market when it was associated with increased risk of infant intussusception (3).
INTRODUCTION
 
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 06 Jun, 2013

Paediatric Day Surgery: Revisiting the University Hospital of the West Indies Experience

Issue: 
Pages: 
320–5
Synopsis: 
A wide variety of paediatric surgical procedures are being done and the complication rates are low. Expansion of the service should be explored so that the cost reduction advantages can be maximized.

ABSTRACT

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Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 03 Jul, 2013

Bile Duct Injuries in the Laparoscopic Era: The University Hospital of the West Indies Experience

Issue: 
Pages: 
228–31
Synopsis: 
A review of all the cases of bile duct injuries seen at the University Hospital of the West Indies since the introduction of laparoscopic cholecystectomy reveals that 60% of all cases resulted from open cholecystectomy and Roux en Y hepaticojejunostomy was the most common surgery offered for major bile duct injury.

ABSTRACT

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 10 Jun, 2013

Rotavirus Vaccine Trial in Jamaica

Issue: 
Pages: 
405–7
Synopsis: 
Rotaviruses have been a significant cause of dehydrating gastroenteritis, contributing to infant morbidity and mortality in Jamaica. We enrolled 1804 Jamaican infants in the international randomized, placebo-controlled, pentavalent (G1, G2, G3, G4 and P1) rotavirus vaccine trial. This pentavalent vaccine was found to significantly reduce rotavirus-attributable emergency room visits and hospitalizations, without increasing the rates of intussusception or other serious adverse events in Jamaican infants.

ABSTRACT

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Journal Authors: 
e-Published: 21 Aug, 2013

Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Chronic Cholecystitis in Jamaican Patients with Sickle Cell Disease: Preliminary Experience

Issue: 
Pages: 
22–4
Synopsis: 
Acute chest syndrome remains a significant problem in patients with sickle cell disease subjected to laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

ABSTRACT

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 06 Jun, 2013

Open Splenectomy in Jamaican Children with Sickle Cell Disease

Issue: 
Pages: 
37–41
Synopsis: 
One-hundred and ten splenectomies performed on children with sickle cell disease at the University Hospital of the West Indies are reviewed. There was low morbidity and no mortality. Open splenectomy remains the gold standard for patients with sickle cell disease requiring splenectomy.

ABSTRACT

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 06 Jun, 2013

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