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R Melbourne-Chambers

The Doctor of Medicine (Paediatrics) Programme at The University of the West Indies, Mona at 45 years, 1972─2017

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2018.176
Pages: 
382–86
Synopsis: 
The DM Paediatrics programme began in 1972 and has fulfilled its mandate to train paediatricians for the Caribbean. These 159 paediatricians are located in the Caribbean and worldwide and deliver appropriate health-care to the region’s children.

ABSTRACT 

Accepted: 
03 Aug, 2018
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 19 Dec, 2018

The Doctor of Medicine (Paediatrics) Programme at The University of the West Indies, Mona at 45 years, 1972─2017

DOI: 
Pages: 
Synopsis: 
The DM Paediatrics programme began in 1972 and has fulfilled its mandate to train paediatricians for the Caribbean. These 159 paediatricians are located in the Caribbean and worldwide and deliver appropriate health-care to the region’s children.
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 04 Dec, 2018

Disclaimer

Manuscripts that are Published Ahead of Print have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of the West Indian Medical Journal. They may appear in their original format and may not be copy edited or formatted in the style guide of this Journal. While accepted manuscripts are not yet assigned a volume, issue or page numbers, they can be cited using the DOI and date of e-publication. See our Instructions for Authors on how to properly cite manuscripts at this stage. The contents of the manuscript may change before it is published in its final form. Manuscripts in this section will be removed once they have been issued to a volume and issue, but will still retain the DOI and date of e-publication.

Meningo-encephalo-myelitis in Children during the Zika Virus Epidemic in Grenada

DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2017.227

ABSTRACT

Accepted: 
18 Dec, 2017
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 20 Dec, 2017

Disclaimer

Manuscripts that are Published Ahead of Print have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of the West Indian Medical Journal. They may appear in their original format and may not be copy edited or formatted in the style guide of this Journal. While accepted manuscripts are not yet assigned a volume, issue or page numbers, they can be cited using the DOI and date of e-publication. See our Instructions for Authors on how to properly cite manuscripts at this stage. The contents of the manuscript may change before it is published in its final form. Manuscripts in this section will be removed once they have been issued to a volume and issue, but will still retain the DOI and date of e-publication.

Trends of Microcephaly and Severe Arthrogryposis in Three Urban Hospitals following the Zika, Chikungunya and Dengue Fever Epidemics of 2016 in Jamaica

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2017.124
Pages: 
10–9
Synopsis: 
Newborns with the characteristics of congenital syndrome associated with Zika virus (CSAZ) are being born in urban hospitals after the 2016 Zika virus epidemic in Jamaica. Phenotypic features include microcephaly, craniofacial disproportion, neuro-imaging and neuro-pathological findings and arthrogryposis. A trend towards babies being delivered with small head circumferences, but not yet in the range of microcephaly and others with normal head sizes who were born to women who were symptomatic in pregnancy is also being observed. While, most babies with probable CSAZ are being born to asymptomatic women who did not report any symptoms related to arbovirus illness in pregnancy. Diagnosis is challenged by serological cross-reactivity between circulating flaviviruses. Team management is multidisciplinary to maximize the neuro-developmental potential of this vulnerable patient population.
ABSTRACT
 
Introduction: Jamaica experienced its maiden Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic in 2016, while dengue (serotypes 3 and 4) and chikungunya were also circulating.
 
Aim: We describe initial trends in microcephaly and arthrogryposis observed by the clinicians from three urban birthing facilities during late 2016 to early 2017.
Accepted: 
12 Jun, 2017
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 12 Jun, 2017

Chikungunya in Jamaica – Public Health Effects and Clinical Features in Children

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2016.529
Pages: 
431-37
Synopsis: 
The Chikungunya Fever epidemic had significant public health and economic impact in Jamaica. In children, there were characteristic presentations in neonates and young infants and in children six months to six years. Neurologic involvement was common but other organ dysfunction was rare.

ABSTRACT

Background: Chikungunya virus entered the Caribbean for the first time in 2013 and Jamaica experienced its maiden epidemic with Chikungunya Fever in 2014. We aimed to describe the public health effects and describe the clinical features in children and adolescents in Jamaica.

Accepted: 
26 Oct, 2016
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 26 Oct, 2016

Acute Paralysis and Neuro-inflammation in Jamaican Children during Zika virus and Dengue Epidemics of 2016

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2016.526
Pages: 
425-30
Synopsis: 
This case series suggests a unique clinical pattern of neuro-inflammation in Jamaican adolescents occurring during the ZIKV epidemic and questions the role of the three circulating arboviruses in the pathogenesis.

ABSTRACT

Accepted: 
24 Oct, 2016
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 25 Oct, 2016

Traditional Antiepileptics Remain First Line Treatment for Children with Epilepsy at The University Hospital of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica

DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2015.473
Synopsis: 
Epilepsy in children at UHWI was reviewed in 63 children. No sex predilection was observed. Focal seizures were the most common overall. Carbamazepine was the drug of choice for treatment of focal seizures initially whilst valproic acid for generalized seizures.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To describe the demography of epilepsy in children at the University Hospital of the West Indies and to review the frequency of major seizure types and antiepileptic drug therapy used at diagnosis.

Accepted: 
11 Sep, 2015
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 08 Mar, 2016

Disclaimer

Manuscripts that are Published Ahead of Print have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of the West Indian Medical Journal. They may appear in their original format and may not be copy edited or formatted in the style guide of this Journal. While accepted manuscripts are not yet assigned a volume, issue or page numbers, they can be cited using the DOI and date of e-publication. See our Instructions for Authors on how to properly cite manuscripts at this stage. The contents of the manuscript may change before it is published in its final form. Manuscripts in this section will be removed once they have been issued to a volume and issue, but will still retain the DOI and date of e-publication.

Routine Laboratory Investigations in Infants and Children Presenting with Fever and Seizures at the University Hospital of the West Indies

Issue: 
Pages: 
369–72
Synopsis: 
Fifty-nine children, aged 6 months to eight years, who presented with fever and seizures were reviewed. There was no laboratory abnormalities significantly associated with a bacterial infection. Routine laboratory investigations in children with seizures and fever were of limited usefulness.

ABSTRACT

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 23 Jul, 2013
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