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MK Tulloch-Reid

Using the HIV Treatment Cascade to Identify Implementation Gaps in Hypertension Management in Jamaica

DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2017.140
Synopsis: 
Hypertension is the single most important determinant of cardiovascular disease in the Caribbean. Applying the HIV treatment cascade to hypertension management helps highlight important hypertension research, treatment, and implementation gaps and can facilitate evaluation of the effectiveness of any interventions.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Hypertension is the biggest contributor to cardiovascular disease – the leading cause of death in Jamaica and the Caribbean.  In this paper, we utilized the HIV treatment cascade model to identify research, treatment and implementation gaps for hypertension in Jamaica 

Accepted: 
12 Dec, 2017
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 13 Dec, 2017

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Manuscripts that are Published Ahead of Print have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of the West Indian Medical Journal. They may appear in their original format and may not be copy edited or formatted in the style guide of this Journal. While accepted manuscripts are not yet assigned a volume, issue or page numbers, they can be cited using the DOI and date of e-publication. See our Instructions for Authors on how to properly cite manuscripts at this stage. The contents of the manuscript may change before it is published in its final form. Manuscripts in this section will be removed once they have been issued to a volume and issue, but will still retain the DOI and date of e-publication.

Hypertension Control: The Caribbean Needs Intervention Studies to Learn How to Do Better

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2017.073
Pages: 
1–3
Synopsis: 
Prevalence of hypertension is high in the Caribbean while control of hypertension is low. Intervention trials are needed to establish low cost, sustainable approaches that work in this region.

Hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease in the Caribbean and globally. It is responsible for 51% of deaths due to cerebrovascular disease (stroke) and 45% of deaths due to ischaemic heart disease, which are the leading causes of death in the Caribbean. The prevalence of hypertension in the Caribbean is high, affecting 21% of adults in Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago, 25% in Jamaica, and 35–38% in St Kitts, British Virgin Islands and Grenada, contributing to the large economic burden from this condition and its complications.

Accepted: 
07 Mar, 2017
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 08 Mar, 2017

Relationship between Early Life Factors and Renal Function in Afro-Caribbean Young Adults: Analysis from the Jamaica 1986 Birth Cohort Study

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2015.450
Pages: 
165-72
Synopsis: 
This study examines the relationship between birth weight and renal function among an Afro-Caribbean population of young adults from the 1986 Jamaica Birth Cohort. Our analyses show significant associations between low birth weight and reduced, estimated, glomerular filtration rate.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the relationship between intrauterine growth and renal function among Jamaican young adults.

Accepted: 
08 Sep, 2015
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 08 Sep, 2015

Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease among Patients Attending a Specialist Diabetes Clinic in Jamaica

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2014.084
Pages: 
201–8
Synopsis: 
This study estimated the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients of the University Hospital of the West Indies diabetes clinic in Jamaica and evaluated the proportion of patients at high risk for adverse outcomes. Approximately 86% of patients had CKD and 70% were at high risk for adverse outcomes.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients attending the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic and to determine the proportion of patients at high risk for adverse outcomes.

Accepted: 
23 Apr, 2014
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 04 May, 2015

Progression from Prehypertension to Hypertension in a Jamaican Cohort: Incident Hypertension and its Predictors

Issue: 
Pages: 
486–93
Synopsis: 
Prehypertension is associated with an approximately three-fold increase in the incidence of hypertension over an average four-year follow-up period. Overweight status, older age and female gender are also significant predictors for the development of hypertension.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To estimate the incidence of hypertension in people with and without prehypertension and determine the factors that predict progression to hypertension.

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 15 Oct, 2013

Clinical and Laboratory Features of Youth Onset Type 2 Diabetes in Jamaica

Issue: 
Pages: 
131–8
Synopsis: 
Patients from two tertiary referral hospitals were assessed to determine whether Type 2 diabetes mellitus was present in Jamaican diabetic youth. Type 2 diabetes accounted for 22% of cases. Obesity was the most important clinical predictor of Type 2 diabetes.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To assess the frequency of youth onset Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) in Jamaica and the characteristics of youth with this form of diabetes.

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 02 Oct, 2013

The Epidemiology of Diabetes Mellitus in Jamaica and the Caribbean: A Historical Review

Issue: 
Pages: 
259–64
Synopsis: 
Epidemiological studies over the last 50 years have documented an increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the Caribbean. Diabetes is associated with a high rate of complications, high economic cost and is a leading cause of mortality in the region.

ABSTRACT

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 07 Oct, 2013

Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome in Jamaican Adults and its Relationship to Income and Education Levels

Issue: 
Pages: 
265–73
Synopsis: 
In this cross-sectional study, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in Jamaican adults was 21.1% and 18.4% using the International Diabetes Federation and American Heart Association/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute criteria, respectively. Metabolic syndrome prevalence was associated with socio-economic status in men.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in Jamaican adults and to evaluate its association with socio-economic status (SES).

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 07 Oct, 2013

National Health Surveys and Health Policy: Impact of the Jamaica Health and Lifestyle Surveys and the Reproductive Health Surveys

Issue: 
Pages: 
372–9
Synopsis: 
Over the last 30 years, national health surveys, such as the Jamaica Health and Lifestyle Surveys and Reproductive Health Surveys, have helped to document the burden of disease and influence public health policy in Jamaica. It is envisioned that expansion and systemic integration of these surveys in Jamaica will serve to improve health and development.

ABSTRACT

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 21 Aug, 2013

Body Mass Index and Prostate Specific Antigen Levels in Jamaican Men

Issue: 
Pages: 
316–21
Synopsis: 
The relationship between serum PSA and BMI was examined in men referred to urology clinics in Jamaica. There was an inverse relationship between PSA and BMI among men with prostate cancer. Clinicians should take this relationship into account when interpreting patients’ PSA results.

ABSTRACT


Objective: To investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels in Jamaican men.

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 31 Jan, 2014

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