Close Menu

Jamaica

Sociodemographic Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms among Elderly Persons from Two Communities in Kingston, Jamaica

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2012.273
Pages: 
615–9
Synopsis: 
In this study of 200 elderly persons aged 60 years and over, predictors of depression were older age, female gender, low socio-economic status and low level of cognitive function.
ABSTRACT
 
Objective: To explore possible associations of age, gender, socio-economic status, educational level and level of cognitive functioning with depressive symptoms in a community sample of elderly persons.
 
Accepted: 
27 Feb, 2013
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 22 Jan, 2014

Incidence of Childhood Cancer in Kingston and St Andrew, Jamaica, 1983–2002

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2012.009
Pages: 
575–81
Synopsis: 
The rankings of the commonest childhood malignancies in Jamaica (leukaemia, brain and spinal neoplasms and lymphomas) have shown few changes since the last review. However, there are unexplained differences in frequency and gender distribution of some tumours.
ABSTRACT
 
Objectives: There have been several modifications to the classification of childhood cancers since the first report (1968–1981) specific to the Jamaican paediatric population was published in 1988. This paper reports on paediatric cancer incidence in Kingston and St Andrew, Jamaica, for the 20-year period 1983–2002 based on these modifications.
 
Accepted: 
28 May, 2012
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 22 Jan, 2014

Correlates of Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety among Clinic Patients in Western Jamaica

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2012.177
Pages: 
533–42
Synopsis: 
To ascertain the prevalence of symptoms of depression and anxiety and their correlates, surveys containing sociodemographics and items from both the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II were administered to outpatient clinic attendees in Western Jamaica.

ABSTRACT 

Objectives: There is a paucity of studies on psychosocial disorders in clinic populations in Jamaica. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalence and correlates of symptoms of depression and anxiety in a clinic population in western Jamaica.

Revised: 
08 Oct, 2012
Accepted: 
29 Oct, 2012
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 14 Nov, 2013

Suicide Attempt by Self-poisoning: Characteristics of Suicide Attempters Seen at the Emergency Room at the University Hospital of the West Indies

Issue: 
Pages: 
526–31
Synopsis: 
Of the sample of 127 patients seen for attempted suicide by self-poisoning, 75.6% were females. The age cohort 16–30 years represented the largest number of cases (70.8%).

ABSTRACT

Objective: To document the characteristics of self-poisoning suicide attempters who were brought to the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Emergency Room and to outline the type of drug used in the attempt.

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 24 Oct, 2013

Suicide Ideation in Jamaican Youth: Sociodemographic Prevalence, Protective and Risk Factors

Issue: 
Pages: 
521–5
Synopsis: 
The prevalence of suicide ideation among Jamaican youth is 9.7%.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the prevalence of suicidal ideation and examine the association between suicidal ideation and sociodemographic characteristics, protective and risk factors among Jamaican
youth.

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 24 Oct, 2013

Suicide among Adolescents in Jamaica: What Do We Know?

Issue: 
Pages: 
516–20
Synopsis: 
For the period 2007–2010, the adolescent suicide rate in Jamaica was 1.1 per 100 000 adolescents with a preponderance of male deaths by hanging.

ABSTRACT


Objective: Suicide is increasingly acknowledged as a global problem. Yet little is known worldwide about suicide rates among adolescents. Several social factors that exist in Jamaica present as stressors and may predispose to suicide. Ascertaining prevailing patterns and associated factors is important for crafting interventions. This paper establishes adolescent suicide rates for the years 2007–2010 in Jamaica and provides related epidemiological data.

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 24 Oct, 2013

The Epidemiology of Suicide in Jamaica 2002–2010: Rates and Patterns

Issue: 
Pages: 
509–15
Synopsis: 
For the period 2002–2010, suicide rates in Jamaica have been stable with a mean overall annual incidence of 2.1 per 100 000 population.

ABSTRACT

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 24 Oct, 2013

Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents in Jamaica

Issue: 
Pages: 
494–8
Synopsis: 
Among the sample of students surveyed, 4.5% (n = 134) reported having depressive symptoms.

ABSTRACT


Background: Depression in adolescents is often overlooked and misdiagnosed; however, it is an important mental health problem which is associated with major functional impairments across daily domains of living, and considerable morbidity. The aim of this research is to examine the prevalence of self-reported depressive symptoms among Jamaican adolescents, and the associated sociodemographic factors.

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 24 Oct, 2013

Factors Related to Obstetric Third and Fourth Degree Perineal Lacerations in a Jamaican Cohort

Issue: 
Pages: 
195–8
Synopsis: 
The two main factors related to severe obstetric perineal lacerations were babies weighing more than 3.5 kg and operative vaginal deliveries.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify significant and modifiable risk factors associated with obstetric third and fourth degree perineal lacerations and to produce recommendations that may reduce their morbidity and prevalence.

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 17 Oct, 2013

Subjective Well-being of Adults with Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease in Jamaica

Issue: 
Pages: 
181–7
Synopsis: 
Advances in treatment of sickle cell disease have improved the prognosis for patients. As these patients are living longer, issues of subjective well-being become important. Past studies have mostly focussed on patients’ negative life experiences. This study examines both patients’ positive and negative experiences, as well as their satisfaction with life.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study compared the subjective well-being of adults with homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease to a matched group of healthy adult peers. The differential influence of sociodemographic factors on the subjective well-being of Sickle Cell patients was also examined.

PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
Journal Authors: 
e-Published: 17 Oct, 2013

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Jamaica
Top of Page