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The War on Humans Anti-trafficking in the Caribbean

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This article considers the attention paid to human trafficking in the
Caribbean by governments of the region. It first examines how countries in
the region have been positioned in the annual US Trafficking in Persons
(TIP) Report from 2001 to 2016, discussing the shortcomings of hegemonic
discourses to trafficking such as problems with definitions, statistics and
evidence, the political underpinnings of the TIP report, and contradictions
in indices of ‘development’ in the region. It then turns to examine

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Introduction: Countering Human Trafficking

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Beyond Sun and Sea: International Strategy and Entrepreneurship in Caribbean Firms

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Book Review

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Britain’s Black Debt: Reparations for Caribbean Slavery and Native Genocide

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Book Review

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Making a Country More Entrepreneurial: Policy Choices and Implications For Jamaica

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Notes and Comments

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A Commentary on SMEs in Brazil: Lessons for Jamaica and the Caribbean

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This article is a commentary on primary research conducted in 2014 on the
SME sector in Brazil. Its purpose is to provide broad policy recommendations
for MSME development and engagement in Jamaica and
CARICOM. The main aim of the research is to identify best practices
within the Brazilian SME sector which can be adapted to the CARICOM
context. This is in an effort to stimulate discussions and future research
within the area. The article briefly examines two of the largest nongovernmental
organizations in Brazil (SEBRAE and CNI) which focus on

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Knowledge Management Systems for Small Family-Owned Businesses—The Case of the English-speaking Caribbean

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Small family-owned businesses (FOBs) represent an important sector of
the economy in the English-speaking Caribbean (ESC). But the
generational transition and longevity of these businesses is threatened by
the depletion of key areas of knowledge, due in part to inadequate
knowledge management; and compounded by the unstructured and
informal nature of these businesses.
Drawing on data from Barbados, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago,
and using a Design Science approach, this article proposes a knowledge

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Barriers to Entrepreneurship and Innovation: An Institutional Analysis of Mobile Banking in Jamaica and Kenya

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Growth in mobile phone penetration is one of the most significant
technological developments in human history, spurring a number of
innovations and entrepreneurial opportunities. Among these is the
conduct of monetary transactions via the mobile phone, which promises to
revolutionise access to financial services and opportunities for business
and entrepreneurship in developing countries. However, whereas mobile
banking via M-Pesa has revolutionised financial services and access in

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A Sectoral Analysis of E-Money Consumption and Growth

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This article investigates the relationship between e-money, consumption
and sectoral growth in Jamaica using the Autoregressive Distributed Lag
(ARDL) model. Using this technique, we evaluate whether e-money has a
long run relationship with the real economy. The definition of e-money is
restricted in this article to card payments. Both the size of card payments
and the payment penetration were evaluated. Card payments were
disaggregated into internet, point of sale (POS) and automated bank

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Social Entrepreneurship Practices for Accountability of NPOS In Small Island Economies: Trinidad & Tobago

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Non-profit organisations (NPOs) are mistrusted, due to a percep-tion that
they are ineffective, poorly managed, and dependent on financial support.
This has led to demands for more accountability and for more business-like
behaviour.
While International NPOs have embraced key social entrepreneurship
(SE) practices, there is little empirical evidence that these
practices ensure accountability. This article addresses that information gap
from a conceptual and contextual perspective, demonstrating that

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