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Jamaica

The Impact of Visual Impairment on the Quality of Life of Diabetic Patients Attending the University Hospital of the West Indies

DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2017.179
Synopsis: 
Visual loss from diabetic retinopathy can affect the quality of life (QOL) of diabetic patients. This study assesses the impact of visual impairment on the QOL, and relationship of other factors, including age, marital status, employment, exercise and diet compliance.

ABSTRACT

Objective:  To assess the impact of visual impairment on the quality of life (QOL) of patients with diabetic retinopathy attending the Retina Eye Clinic at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI).

Accepted: 
20 Dec, 2017
Journal Sections: 
Journal Authors: 
e-Published: 22 Dec, 2017

Disclaimer

Manuscripts that are Published Ahead of Print have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of the West Indian Medical Journal. They may appear in their original format and may not be copy edited or formatted in the style guide of this Journal. While accepted manuscripts are not yet assigned a volume, issue or page numbers, they can be cited using the DOI and date of e-publication. See our Instructions for Authors on how to properly cite manuscripts at this stage. The contents of the manuscript may change before it is published in its final form. Manuscripts in this section will be removed once they have been issued to a volume and issue, but will still retain the DOI and date of e-publication.

Family Structure, Parental Monitoring and Marijuana Use among Adolescents in Jamaica: Findings from Nationally Representative Data

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2017.212
Pages: 
536-45
Synopsis: 
This study analysed the role of the family as a determinant of marijuana use among the Jamaican secondary school population. Results demonstrated that parental involvement carried more weight in influencing marijuana use than family structure and gender which showed no significant difference.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Marijuana misuse by adolescents is a social and public mental health problem in Jamaica and globally. Research has suggested that family structure is one of the factors that influences adolescents’ consumption of marijuana. This study was undertaken to determine if family structure and parental monitoring had any association with marijuana use among adolescents in Jamaica.

Accepted: 
23 Oct, 2017
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 30 Nov, 2017

Cannabis Use among Secondary School Students in Jamaica: Factors Associated with Age of Initiation

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2017.214
Pages: 
546-52
Synopsis: 
The aim of the study was to determine whether perception of risk and accessibility of cannabis predicted the age of initiation of cannabis among secondary school students in Jamaica. Whereas there was a significant inverse association between grade level in school and age of initiation, perceptions of access did not predict the age of initiation of cannabis.

ABSTRACT

Accepted: 
23 Oct, 2017
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 26 Oct, 2017

A Note on the Prevalence of Impaternity in Jamaica

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2016.546
Pages: 
521

 The Editor,

 Sir,

Genetics studies often depend on the certainty of correct genotypes in both parents.  In Jamaica, it is common knowledge that some fathers may not be the true biological father but the prevalence of impaternity is not published because of the difficulties and expense of determining the biological fathers by DNA studies.

Accepted: 
03 Jul, 2017
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
Journal Authors: 
e-Published: 03 Jul, 2017

Jamaica and Research in Sickle Cell Disease

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2016.547
Pages: 
457–68
Synopsis: 
Many developments have occurred in sickle cell disease and care over the last 50 years in Jamaica. The clinic population grew from 50–60 in the mid-1960s to 5500 in late 1999. During this period, the number of staff serving sickle cell patients increased from 2 to 28, comprising physicians, paediatricians, nurses, laboratory technologists, social workers, computer staff and statisticians. The physical facilities have improved greatly, and data management has evolved from the type written long narrow paper strips in the late 1960s to sophisticated electronic patient management systems. The many physical resources and the superb opportunities of an ‘island laboratory’ have pro-vided a unique basis for clinical research into the disease.

ABSTRACT

Accepted: 
03 Jul, 2017
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
Journal Authors: 
e-Published: 03 Jul, 2017

Trends of Microcephaly and Severe Arthrogryposis in Three Urban Hospitals following the Zika, Chikungunya and Dengue Fever Epidemics of 2016 in Jamaica

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2017.124
Pages: 
10–9
Synopsis: 
Newborns with the characteristics of congenital syndrome associated with Zika virus (CSAZ) are being born in urban hospitals after the 2016 Zika virus epidemic in Jamaica. Phenotypic features include microcephaly, craniofacial disproportion, neuro-imaging and neuro-pathological findings and arthrogryposis. A trend towards babies being delivered with small head circumferences, but not yet in the range of microcephaly and others with normal head sizes who were born to women who were symptomatic in pregnancy is also being observed. While, most babies with probable CSAZ are being born to asymptomatic women who did not report any symptoms related to arbovirus illness in pregnancy. Diagnosis is challenged by serological cross-reactivity between circulating flaviviruses. Team management is multidisciplinary to maximize the neuro-developmental potential of this vulnerable patient population.
ABSTRACT
 
Introduction: Jamaica experienced its maiden Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic in 2016, while dengue (serotypes 3 and 4) and chikungunya were also circulating.
 
Aim: We describe initial trends in microcephaly and arthrogryposis observed by the clinicians from three urban birthing facilities during late 2016 to early 2017.
Accepted: 
12 Jun, 2017
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 12 Jun, 2017

Burden of Paediatric Sepsis in a Tertiary Centre from a Developing Country

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2017.040
Pages: 
137-42
Synopsis: 
This study estimated the case fatality rate of doctor diagnosed pediatric sepsis using administrative data. There was a high (13%) overall case fatality rate from doctor diagnosed pediatric sepsis during the five-year period studied.

ABSTRACT

Background: Sepsis causes significant pediatric morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This audit describes the outcome of pediatric sepsis in the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), Jamaica using administrative data from hospital records during 2010 to 2014.

Revised: 
04 Jun, 2018
Accepted: 
21 Mar, 2017
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 22 Mar, 2017

Availability and use of Contraceptive Implants in Jamaica: Results of a Medical Record Review and Provider Survey in Six Health Centers

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2016.554
Pages: 
114-21
Synopsis: 
Sub-dermal implants have few insertion complications and side-effects and are effective, but they are underutilized in Jamaica. Enhanced provider training and import in Jamaica may increase availability and utilization among women, leading to a long-term reduction in unintended pregnancy rates.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The prevalence of sub-dermal contraceptive implant use in Jamaica is low despite growing international acceptance of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC). We assessed the availability, effectiveness, side-effects and utilization of sub-dermal contraceptive implants, and described characteristics of users over a one-year period.

Accepted: 
11 Jan, 2017
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 26 Jan, 2017

Chikungunya in Jamaica – Public Health Effects and Clinical Features in Children

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2016.529
Pages: 
431-37
Synopsis: 
The Chikungunya Fever epidemic had significant public health and economic impact in Jamaica. In children, there were characteristic presentations in neonates and young infants and in children six months to six years. Neurologic involvement was common but other organ dysfunction was rare.

ABSTRACT

Background: Chikungunya virus entered the Caribbean for the first time in 2013 and Jamaica experienced its maiden epidemic with Chikungunya Fever in 2014. We aimed to describe the public health effects and describe the clinical features in children and adolescents in Jamaica.

Accepted: 
26 Oct, 2016
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 26 Oct, 2016

Outcome of Dengue in Hospitalized Jamaican Children

Issue: 
DOI: 
10.7727/wimj.2016.525
Pages: 
442-49
Synopsis: 
Before the emergence of Zika in 2016 and Chikungunya in 2014, there have been numerous dengue outbreaks in the Caribbean. Despite this, there is a paucity of published studies on dengue in children from this region. The potential for exponential spread of the Aedes aegypti dengue vector and its deleterious outcomes in children underlines the importance of this paper.

ABSTRACT

Background: Dengue fever is hyper-endemic in Jamaica with exponential rates of infection in successive outbreaks. The absence of local data and the potential for massive outbreaks in a country where a third of the population are children formed the basis for this study. 

Accepted: 
26 Oct, 2016
PDF Attachment: 
Journal Sections: 
e-Published: 26 Oct, 2016

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